Women Transforming India through Education – A Vital Perspective

Women Transforming India through Education – A Vital Perspective

[A woman who has carved a niche for herself in a strongly patriarchal society and runs a chain of educational institutes in Amritsar. She caters to the educational needs of about a hundred villages of the Punjab’s border district and has become a hope of millions. She believes that education is the only way to transform India and get rid of age old social vices. She advocates women centric change and believes that women should inspire from their fellow women and take lead to empower others and contribute whole heartedly for a gender just future India]. [Sidana Institutes,Amritsar,Punjab] [Dr. Jeewan Jyoti Sidana-Principal and Owner Sidana Institutes of Education] An Interview with Dr. Jeewan Jyoti Sidana-Principal and Owner Sidana Institutes of Education, Amritsar, Punjab by Dr Adfar Shah-Editor at Analyst World. Adfar Shah: Tell us about your journey Dr. Jeevan Jyoti Sidana? What was your mission at the outset and to whom do you attribute your success? Jeewan Jyoti Sidana: Since my parents were from the teaching profession, they have been a source of inspiration to me always and undoubtedly my consistent hard work led to this stage where I own and administer a chain of educational institutes today. I had the distinction among the toppers of Punjab in the 10th standard and got a prestigious State Level scholarship from the government. After marriage, at the age of 21 my husband, Mr. Mohinder Pal Sidana, motivated and encouraged me to pursue Ph.D which I completed in 2002. Luckily, I got the opportunity to serve at Lovely Institutes, where I served as a principal from 2003 to 2006. After completing the Doctorate in the discipline of education and gaining vital experience as a teacher-educator for 16 years, I thought of opening an institute in this border area Amritsar district to provide quality education to the students of this region. So, along with the valuable support of my family and the representatives of this area, I established these institutes. During this period, I faced a lot of difficulties but God was kind enough and things became smooth gradually. The family and the faculty also supported me in every way. As change is the law of nature so...

Over AAWI Elections- A Dialogue with Mahesh Vaswani

Over AAWI Elections- A Dialogue with Mahesh Vaswani

  Advocate Mahesh Vaswani is a activist lawyer campaigning for AUDIO – VIDEO recordings of all Judicial  proceedings in Courts. Acting Chief Justice Hemant Gokhale and Chief Justice Swatanter Kumar of Bombay High Court had during their tenure felicitated and honored Mahesh with Certificates for legal aid projects involving sitting judges of Bombay High Court and rural poor and the slum dwellers of Mumbai. Mahesh practices and specialises in Criminal law in Sessions and High Court at Mumbai and also appear in Supreme Court as well. Mahesh is currently contesting, for the elections at AAWI (Advocates Association for Western India).    The Analyst World (TAW) : What is your primary intention behind contesting the AAWI Elections? Would you reason out the same. Mahesh Vaswani (MV) : My primary intention behind contesting the AAWI is to improve the working conditions of lawyers and help lawyers benefit from developing law. TAW : Can you Please elaborate about the steps which you would take to improve the working conditions of Lawyers, citing some specific issues and proposed solutions for a clearer understanding. MW : Lawyers at trial Courts would be better functioning if mic is provided to the presiding officers during trials. Also lawyers have to work in most inhuman and harsh conditions in crowded courts during summer. In districts Vasai, Panvel and Alibaug and rural Maharashtra, lights go off in middle of proceedings. But proceedings go on… imagine how. Also there is rampant pilfering and theft of court records. These must be made more secure. And of course conference areas with clients for all lawyers in all courts. Also hygienic toilets for women at least needed. So also for male lawyers and public in all courts. Even Mumbai HC toilets are unhygienic. TAW : What in your opinion are the prime problems faced by Lawyers in the present Legal System? How would you make any difference as compared to other contestants? MW :  The primary problems of lawyers today is they do not have full access to latest developing law in Supreme Court or High Courts, and also they have severe office space issues. Often there is issue of decorum, dignity and administrative problems faced by lawyers and...

A Dialogue with Nana Chudasama

A Dialogue with Nana Chudasama

Nana Chudasama is an eminent jurist and a former mayor and Sheriff of Mumbai. He is the founder of the NGO Giants International which has over 500 branches in India and branches across the world including the United States, United Kingdom, South Africa, Mauritius and Ukraine. Giants undertakes projects which have an impact on society, such as family welfare, disaster management, education, environment and so on.   Mukul: Sir, speaking about Giants International, it has over 500 branches in India and abroad. What made you start the organization and Why? Nana: There are various organizations like Lions, Rotary, etc., so we thought lets start our own. We started from Bombay and our old office is at Chowpaty. The response is very good so we have started it abroad too. Mukul: What is the Objective of this organization? Nana: To serve the people. We help the people. Now in Uttarakhand and in various calamities affected areas we are sending a team to help. Panini: Do you find people in need? Nana: We do not find people. We have projects like ‘A girl child’, because in this country the proportion is going down. Everybody wants a son. No one needs a girl. they are very cruel. Mukul: You were also the president for a forum against drugs and aids. How successful has narcotics been in controlling the drugs? Nana: Not narcotics, but I can tell you, that our efforts have made one thing good, that the use of drugs has reduced. Now there is hardly any AIDS patient. We are running a centre here. We used to get a lot of patients who are suffering from aids now we hardly have any thing. May be two or three. We examine people, and if they are suffering from AIDS or if they are drug addicts, we do the counseling. We also give medication free of charge, that will help. Its like rehabilitation center. Panini: where does the fund come from? Nana: Generally, people support us, like Banks, corporate sectors. Mukul: Sir, your banner above Pizza by the bay, has time and again created controversy. Like in the case of M.F. Hussain’s return, a banner was put up,...

A Dialogue with Sucheta Dalal

A Dialogue with Sucheta Dalal

  Sucheta Dalal an award-winning Business Journalist and Author. She was conferred the prestigious Padma Shri for journalism in 2006. Her journalistic career began in 1984 with Fortune India, an investment magazine. She has subsequently worked with Business Standard and The Economic Times and then went on to become Financial Editor of The Times of India. She has been a columnist and consulting editor for The Indian Express Group until 2008. She is now a Consulting Editor for Money LIFE a personal finance fortnightly (www.moneylife.in). Her columns are also published by various publications including the Dainik Hindustan. Known for her numerous investigative pieces in all these areas and most notably for breaking the ‘securities scam’ in 1992, India’s biggest financial scandal until then. She has co-authored a book on the securities scam with her husband Debashis Basu called “The Scam: Who Won, Who lost, Who got away (1993)”. This book, which was a best seller that year, has been revised, updated and re-released in 2001 and again in 2005 (It is now called The Scam: From Harshad Mehta To Ketan Parekh). In March 2000, she wrote a biography of A.D. Shroff, who was considered a financial genius in the 1950s. Pathbreakers—a book of 26 inspiring interviews with eminent Indians—by Sucheta Dalal and Debashis Basu was also released in July 2007. She has been a Member of the Investor Protection and Education Fund set up by the Government of India under the Department of Company Affairs and a member of the Primary Market Advisory Committee of the Securities and Exchange Board of India. She is a Trustee of the Consumer Education and Research Centre of Ahmedabad, which is among the largest consumer and investor advocacy groups in India. She is also a Member of Bank of Baroda’s Standing Committee on consumer services and on the board of Credibility Alliance, which is a consortium of voluntary organizations committed towards enhancing accountability and transparency in the voluntary sector through good governance. Mukul Lathar :  Ma’am, what’s your opinion about laws and if they exist, enforcement to control schemes like multi-level marketing running across the country ? Sucheta Dalal : There are no laws of multi-level marketing schemes. In fact,...

A Dialogue with Shaina NC

A Dialogue with Shaina NC

Mukul Lather: The order banning dance bars was struck down by Bombay High Court, now High Court’s order has been upheld by the Supreme Court, What is the BJP’S stand on Dance Bars and the subsequent legal battle which took place to ban them. Shaina NC: First and foremost the BJP is firm that dance bars are not the need of the hour, the fact that so many people who visited dance bars and spent money of  the family, give misery to the family, give misery to the wife’s of people visiting to the dance bars, the associated rackets with dance bars, prostitution, racketing, drug use, it is not something which the BJP supports and the BJP clearly feels that the Government should file a review petition. Mukul lather: Recently BJP protested against potholes on roads by planting saplings in them in Ghatkopar and Andheri. This seems to have created some friction between BJP and Shiv Sena. Shaina NC: No, the facts that the roads which are maintained by the MMRDA come under the state government that is completely independent of BMC rum roads and the fact that potholes are nightmare for every Mumbaikar this is an issue which legitimate serious opposition needs to take on and that’s exactly what we did, as there is an sense of accountability which is required which clearly has not been seen. Mukul lather: How challenging is the maintenance of BJP -Shiv Sena alliance after 15 years. Shiv Sena: It’s not challenging as the ideology is the same, when we talk about Hindutva, we talk about justice to all and appeasement to none and the point of the matter is that in a society such as ours we constantly  play vote bank politics there can never be progress of the state and our talk is only on development. Mukul Lather: Elections are coming in four states Rajasthan, Delhi, Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh, in the run up to 2014 elections what is their importance and what is BJP’s strategy to win these states? Shaina NC: See I am clear that we will come back to power in Rajasthan for sure because people are very unhappy about Ashok Gehlot’s incompetent...

A Dialogue with Sir R. Gopalakrishnan

A Dialogue with Sir R. Gopalakrishnan

R Gopalakrishnan is an Executive Director with one of the largest Indian business groups – Tata Sons, a holding company to one of the largest Indian business groups The Tata Group.He was educated from St. Xavier’s College, Kolkata at the University of Calcutta. He has worked with Hindustan Levers Hindustan Unilever for over 31 years before joining the Tata Group. Siddharth Acharya: From Hindustan Uni-Lever to Tata, Please share your experience on transition of Indian Economy and how do you see Indian Inc? R. Gopalakrishnan: Well I always say that first half was LPR (License Permit Raj) career and second was LPG means Liberalization Privatization and Globalization. My career grew in the middle of LPG and in the first four years under the pressure of all the crisis which was there in 1991. The broad thing that happens in every entrepreneurial activity is that under pressure you respond better. But our brain is wide to think that best decisions are taken when our brain is calm. I strongly feel best decisions are taken in pressure. And that is reflected in trend of affairs of our economy. Siddhartha: Sir, you made a very strong statement that Crisis makes a leader…..what does make you think that way? R Gopalakrishnan:  See there is nothing smart about leadership….What makes a big leader is the ability to perform under the pressure because anyone can sit down and give you immense gyaan. Suppose if I am an entrepreneur and banks are chasing me, distributors do not want to pay you, lenders have to be paid…you can turn into negative ways and follow wrong crowd….Whatever you learn from life you learn through struggle. Struggle and crisis are the best leaders…We never chase struggle for heck of it..It comes down, so that is the elaboration on my part. Pragnesh Podar: Does it apply to individual and nation as well? R Goplakrishnan: Absolutely. It applies to human effort as an individual, family and as a nation. you see best lessons learnt are not learnt; I would give you an example…When Congress movement started in 1885, it was not started by an Indian, it was started by a Scotsman and he started in Chennai....

A Dialogue with Ram Naik

A Dialogue with Ram Naik

Mr. Ram Naik is a candid politician and true nationalist who believes that leadership is not all about verbal dynamism but also an intention and enthusiasm of doing constructive work for the people. The Analyst World Team had a very deep and insightful discussion with him on current political volatility in nation. AKSHAY MEHTA: Being a prominent leader of BJP and a former Cabinet Minister of Petroleum & Natural Gas, would you like to share with us the ‘ups and downs’ you faced throughout your political career? RAM NAIK: As far as the ups and downs are concerned, I would like to tell you in brief about my transition from a middle class person to being a minister. I came to Bombay in 1954 to work in an account general’s office, after completing B.com from Pune. In Bombay, I joined K.C. Law College. After completing law, I joined Khira’s steel company. I, then got my first political breakthrough when I joined Bhartiya Jan Sangh(BJS) as a full time member. From 1969-1974, I worked as a head organizational department of BJS in Mumbai. However, during the emergency period (1975-1977), BJS suffered a setback as many of its leaders were arrested. After emergency, BhatiyaJanata Party (BJP) was formed by merging BJS, Socialist Party and Congress Organization(CO). So, this is how I became a part of BJP. Earlier there was a rule in BJP that organizational head could not contest election, however due to lack of leaders I was asked to contest. In 1978 I contested for assembly from Borivalli, Mumbai. I was MLA for three terms (1978, 1980 and 1985). I became the president of Mumbai Unit of BJP in 1980 and during the first Party session or Maha-Adhiveshan I presided as the Swagat-Adhyaksh. Then 1989, I won the LokSabha election with a record vote difference of 89,000 in Mumbai. I was a member of parliament for 5 terms (1989,1991,1996,1998,1999) For the first three terms, I was in the opposition. But, then in 1998 I was in charge of 5 ministries –       Planning And Programme Implemention, –       Home Ministry, –       Minister Of Railways and Chief Accountant, From 1999-2004, I was the Petroleum Minister. I brought in...

Bash on Regardless – Shyam Benegal

Bash on Regardless – Shyam Benegal

“I never give any kind of message, because every person has to find his own way…” ShyamBenegal, is amongst the people meeting whom is a privilege. A veteran Indian film director and rather a visionary. Interacting with a wise person such as himself whose office’s simplicity to start with was an eye soothing sight and getting to know his way of making films, technically referred to as “middle cinema” was indeed an experience. A highly learned and soft spoken gentleman, who’s appealing personality and his talks full of fruitful and fulfilled experiences, he has shared with The Analyst World Team. A word with Shyam Benegal VEDCHETAN PATIL : The reason we wanted to have this “Dialogue” with you is because when the film industry was moving towards glamour, yours was an absolutely different approach. So, in accordance to that, we’d like to know more about your thought process especially about the movies. SHYAM BENEGAL :  Well, what is glamour? You have to define what glamour is, because to me when you say somebody is glamorous…How do you define galmorous?….. For me the person with painted lips and wearing fancy clothes is not necessarily glamorous. “Glamour for me is something that which comes from the innate self.”  Some people are glamorous by nature, some people are not. But, making somebody add this  doesn’t make any difference. Basically, beauty is important. It’s like saying, TajMahal is very beautiful, but does it need whitewash to make it look more beautiful? We don’t need that. Similarly, glamour doesn’t mean anything to me, beauty does. And beauty can be of so many types, there can be beauty in personality, in looks, in action, in speech. All these things are a part of the same thing, so what you need on top of this to whitewash the TajMahal? I’m not interested; it’s about how you define glamorous. Like, for instance, when I started, I didn’t do any make up on my artists, neither girls, nor boys. In fact, if they had any make up on their face, I’d make them remove it. If girls had lipstick on, I’d have it removed. The reason being, there is natural beauty to people....

A Dialogue with Agha Humayun Amin Major (r)

A Dialogue with Agha Humayun Amin Major (r)

Agha Humayun Amin Major (r) Tank Corps: 13 Years service in Pakistan Army (PAVO 11 Cavalry,29 Cavalry,58 Cavalry,15 Lancers,5 Independent Tank Squadron,14 Lancers,15 SP) and 31 years research . Ex Editor Globe , Ex Assistant Editor Defence Journal , Ex Editor Journal of Afghanistan Studies. Publications: More than 200 articles in News, Nation , PRAVDA,Pakistan Army Journal , Citadel Magazine of Command and Staff College,Journal of Afghanistan Studies,Indian Strategic Review,Dawn ,Friday Times,Outlook Afghanistan ,Afghanistan Times,Frontier Post,Globe,Defence Journal,Media Monitors Network,Pakistan Army till 1965 held at US Army War College Library,US Army Command and Staff College Library,Indo Pak Wars a Strategic and Operational Analysis,Sepoy Rebellion of 1857-59 Reinterpreted, The Essential Clausewitz,Man’s Role in History: Education/Credentials : Masters (History). Past/Present Clients: Various Think Tanks , Afghanistan Research Associates,Centre for Study of Non State Militant Actors in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Can you share some of the important events of which you were an active part in your Military Service? The first event was 1984 mobilization. Pakistan Army was in bad shape and would have come to certain grief if India had attacked. We were mobilized and concentrated at Qila Sobha Singh near Pasrur. Tanks were in bad shape and the nuclear deterrent was not there. Only assassination of Indira Gandhi averted the disaster that Pakistan was sure to face. The second event was 1987 mobilization in face of Brasstacks. Again the Pakistani military was in bad shape but disaster narrowly avoided because Indians had no long term strategic vision. The Indians lost three golden chances to strategically reduce Pakistan in size in 1971, 1984 and 1987.Now Indians will reap the harvest of destabilization, which would be difficult to foresee as well as handle. What exactly do you mean by destabilization? When India avoided the chance to reduce Pakistan by size, then what exactly are you referring to by destabilization? India lost chances to deal with the Pakistan factor in 1971,1984 and 1987.With the nuclear deterrent now fully active India cannot impose any settlement on Pakistan. The threat of destabilization and a possible war will now increase because of following factors: A new Afghan civil war. US China rivalry in Pakistani Baluchistan. India Pakistan tensions over water. Greater religious...

A Dialogue with Amin Solkar- Advocate of Kasab

A Dialogue with Amin Solkar- Advocate of Kasab

Vedchetan Patil: So, firstly I’d like to ask you about your entire inclination and background behind all your activities for the protection of the minority rights. What drove you for the same? Amin Solkar: Being a member of minority. Vedchetan Patil : (cuts in) No, of course, being a minority. But there would be something you would have felt. Some injustice which is happening in this country and which should be addressed? Amin Solkar : Which particular injustice you’re talking about? Vedchetan Patil : What is the one point where the secular India is going wrong and which should be addressed? Amin Solkar :A We are about 60 years post-independence and in the Constitution, what minorities were promised, sometimes we feel that, those promises are not yet fulfilled. Like, if you see economically, then education and appointment to an important post. Even there we basically feel that the promises are not kept. When the minorities had chosen to be in India, in 1947, a choice was given to them that, those who want to go to Pakistan can go, and those  who’d like to stay here in India can stay here. Since we were born and brought up here and had our ancestors living in India, So, we were not willing to go to a total new land. But aftersome years,  we felt, that we should fight for our rights also. Now if you see, there was no need for any minority commission. There was no need for a ministry specifically for minority affairs. What was the need? Earlier it was not there. So, this in itself  indicates that the minorities are not being treated as  equivalent. And to uplift them,  the government thought  of making a newministry or some mechanism where the upliftment can be monitored and then they have come up with some financial foundations. That was not that early. Now, whatever schemes the government is coming up with is really reaching those people or not is another question. Vedchetan Patil : So, whatever mechanism that has evolved, either by the state or by the minority institution as per the relevant articles of the constitution of India, do you think it’s working...

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