Cameron is right – Ravi Shanker Kapoor

Cameron is right – Ravi Shanker Kapoor

We have been so badly brainwashed by Marxist historians, who fatten on Congress patronage, and dogmatic intellectuals that we are unable to see the past as it was—and view it from the prism made of Leftist biases and chauvinistic absurdities. Unsurprisingly, there are subjects that occasion jingoistic spasms and orgasms among us. The Jallianwalla Bagh massacre of 1919 is one of them. UK Prime Minister David Cameron’s refusal to apologize for the incident has many of us angry at his supposed insensitivity. This was despite the fact that he called it a “deeply shameful event in British history.” Later, he justified his refusal to saying sorry. He rightly pointed out that the incident took place 40 years before his birth and it would not be “the right thing to reach back into history and to seek out things you can apologize for.” Cameron’s position is right because acceptance of the position of those who want to correct the wrongs of history would open Pandora’s box—more such demands, more unnecessary controversies, much unpleasantness between nations, groups, etc. To begin with, if the British should apologize for the 1919 outrage, and maybe the 1857-58 atrocities and the Indian conquest before that, why shouldn’t same demands made on Iranians, Afghans, and many other Muslim invaders? Nadir Shah, termed the Napoleon of Persia, is still remembered for his general massacre (qatl-e-aam) in Delhi in 1739. In one single day, March 22, the Persian Emperor’s troops killed 20,000 to 30,000 Indians. The Mughal king at that time, Mohammad Shah, abjectly begged for the stoppage of the carnage. This was apart from the plunder Nadir Shah and his soldiers perpetrated. The booty included the fabled Peacock Throne and the Koh-i-Noor and Darya-ye Noor diamonds. Such was the magnitude of the loot that Nadir did not need to tax his subjects for three years. Yet, neither Iranians have ever said sorry for the conduct of their ancestors nor has anybody in India demanded any apology from them. A few years later, the hordes of Ahmad Khan Abdali, who is regarded as the founder of the modern state of Afghanistan, descended upon northern India. In the Third Battle of Panipat (1761), the...

Of Afzal’s Execution and Aftermath: A Kashmir Perspective – Adfar Shah

Of Afzal’s Execution and Aftermath: A Kashmir Perspective – Adfar Shah

Adfar Shah “How will you feel if your Cell phone network is deliberately put off on your own nation’s Republic or Independence Day? How will you feel if your contact to outer world via internet is blocked for weeks together, in the name of security or law and order measures? How will you feel when you are always given a feeling of being a second class citizen in your own country? How will you feel, if you miss your very important events, deadlines, submissions, appointments, trips, family events, or festive occasions just because of the State, system and its security impasse? Who will reimburse you for all the losses you met because of the repressive state apparatus? How will you feel if you fear to be booked for even a simple analytical post on social media? Who actually pays the cost of chaos in conflict zones and who gets benefitted in such chaotic geographies? What does state mean by collective conscience? All these subjects haunt us and divulge the pain of suppressed existence here in Indian Kashmir.” Kashmir Valley-the bruised paradise is again on boil and as usual unpredictable, peace deficit and active on the volcano of hostility. The fallouts of the mass unrest and shaping up of the geography of anger have finally set the peace process ablaze by clouding the paltry gains secured after enormous and all-round painstaking efforts of over last two years, that too in a blink of eye. Also, it will not be wrong to argue that even the shocking Khanyar Shrine burning incident in the last summer (Dastgeer Sahab shrine’s mysterious ablaze episode on June 25, 2012), or later the protests over the blasphemous and anti-Islamic American video or the most recent incident of the Rock Band row (cry over the Kashmiri Muslim girls’ only Rock band- ‘Pragaash’  and Grand Mufti’s Fatwa against it) though gave some jolts to the fragile peace here but generally speaking, all the three incidents were not too severe, affecting and upsetting. However, the  blistering and perhaps much grave issue is the secret execution of the Parliament attack case convict, Mohamad Afzal Guru (on February 9, 2013 in Tihar Jail) and later a plethora...

The Rock Band (Pragaash) Row in Kashmir – Adfar Shah

The Rock Band (Pragaash) Row in Kashmir – Adfar Shah

Adfar Shah Smaller issues turn monsters in Kashmir and more often due to media hyperbole. After a plethora of infamous Chalo’s (protest marches) and Bandhs (civil curfews/shutdowns) during the past few summer unrests be that infamous Amarnath Land Row, (2008), The violent unrest of 2009 (Shopian Double rape and Murder case row) and Machil Fake encounter Row in 2010 and then after a fragile/deceptive calm, the mysterious ablaze incident of the revered Saint Dastgeer Sahab’s Shrine’s  (in Khanyar, Srinagar)  in  June ,2012, throwing the State government  especially the J&K Muslim Waqf Board to sharp criticism among public and intellectual circles. Now 2013 has begun with yet another controversy, a yet another row (though too mild) has started out of nothing exactly, after the brilliant and award winning performance by the valley’s lone girl Rock Band named as Pragaash (morning light) bringing once again the already controversial Grand Mufti of Jammu and Kashmir State into the lime light for issuing a Fatwa against such bands as unislamic. The band soon after its performance in the last December, had started receiving a high virtual intimidation and condemnation via facebook, etc, reflecting the nature of society we are and the kind of violent, unholy and immoral moral brigade, which has developed over a period of time. The Mufti Azam (people say self claiming) added fuel to the fire by his fatawa against the rock band as if it was the last evil/sin left to pure Kashmiri Muslim society. Why only the girls Band sounds non-serious to cleric and why he thinks only this is the path of our destruction, is really surprising. Why do we treat female activities more threat to our social or religious fabric and ignore every other thing, still remains to be answered. Is our moral policing really objective and authentic? Thank God, this time the incident has at least not revived the infamous Kanneh-Jung (stone pelting), attacking security personnel, City siege, Curfews, movement restrictions, confrontations with local police and other security agencies, sloganeering, etc, that had become a full fledged culture in this part of the world in the recent past .Perhaps because of the tight regulation by the administration and mostly because...

Kashmir and Sher-e-Kashmir: A Revolution Derailed – PL. D. Parimoo

The slogan that used to echo from the majestic Himalayan mountains of Kashmir-“Ala kari ya waangan Kari-Sheikh kari,Sheikh kari” translated roughly meaning whatever needs to be done(decided)Sheikh will do! Sheikh will do! Such was the absolute degree of trust of Kashmiri masses on one man, Sheikh Mohammed Abdullah, reverentially called Sher e Kashmir. How far the trust of people was rightly placed on him, the Sheikh, is written about with neutrality that leaves the choice of judgment to the reader. This book entails the lives of several enigmatic personalities of the Sub continent that are inextricably entwined by their, beliefs, actions, and by fate. It analyses Gandhi\'s religious pluralism adopted by Sheikh Abdullah and moves on to talk about the fall in Sheikh’s reputation, particularly after his death. National Conference and its founder Sheikh Mohammed Abdullah have long been praised and blamed for things they never did. The author draws upon intimate understanding to illuminate the afterlife of the revolution NAYA KASHMIR.  Kashmir and Sher e Kashmir spans from Kashmir to Delhi, moving from Lahore in Pakistan’s east through Algeria, and leading Capitals of West. The result is a shimmering literary examination of the ghost of Naya Kashmir – no longer Sheikh’s “specter to come” but a haunting presence of the past. In Kashmir and Sher e Kashmir,a revolution derailed P.Parimoo has written a deeply reported generational biography teeming with fresh insights and revealing information, a masterly narrative drawn from a trove of letters, journals, diaries, and other documents. Right from 1770’s history was made for the flesh trade enforced by the ruling colonisers in Kashmir. The later rulers Mughals who had named Kashmir as Baag-i-Khas (special garden) used the valley as a pleasure garden to entertain their guests in the Mughal gardens…it also became a practice during their era to procure beautiful Kashmiri girls for their Subhedars, Mansabdars, and nobles of the court.”    The book unfolds in the small towns and the remote hamlets of Kashmir, before and following the personal struggles of Sheikh Mohammed Abdullah and lesser leaders through the swirl of the twentieth century. The places where  In its greed, the State had stooped low to demeaning and dehumanized levels of...

A frailing democracy – Priti Jain

A frailing democracy – Priti Jain

Forms of governments have been evolving since the inception of the very concept of governance. We started off with monarchy which was considered to be normal, but turned tyrannical and was done away with. It then took the form of Aristocracy but soon transformed itself into being dictatorial and despotic. We moved towards Oligarchy, saw its breakdown and accepted Polity to be our governance. The penchant for Polity did not last and had to make way for Democracy, our current support system.  The form of government that cyclically succeeds a democratic rule is anarchy, a complete lawlessness in the state. Assumed to be the worst of all, might come into being with the banality of democracy. The onus of keeping the true nature of this government intact falls in the laps of the lawmakers. When we come to think of the reasons why we dread the failure of the current system some very potent threats manage to recrudescent in front of us. Democracy thrives on the rule of majority; in fact, loosely they have been treated with the same meaning and respect. But come to look closely, this might not be the absolute truth. What we witness today in India is some kind of mob rule that has been assuming the role of the voice of the people. And mind you, for all the wrong reasons. When it comes to hurting some groups’ religious sentiments, there is a mob attack, a speech kindling violence against a particular community ( in a nation that fundamentally guarantees freedom of speech) or threatening someone not abiding by their rules and laws. Their ideologies and fundamentals are kept high above anyone else’s. This extreme jingoism in the name of fidelity and devotion is indeed misplaced. This takes up the form of a parallel set of governmental organs with a mind of their own. Honestly, their entertainment in this system is a big blotch in the face of democracy. This mob rule is backed by religious and communal fanaticism. When a political or religious leader makes inappropriate or provoking remarks targeting a selected group, there are ripples all over the nation, but with no certain actions taken in succession....

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